Here’s why your future Internet could come through your lightbulb aka Li-Fi

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The tungsten lightbulb has served well over the century or so since it was introduced, but its days are numbered now with the arrival of LED lighting, which consume a tenth of the power of incandescent bulbs and have a lifespan 30 times longer. Potential uses of LEDs are not limited to illumination: smart lighting products are emerging that can offer various additional features, including linking your laptop or smartphone to the internet. Move over Wi-Fi, Li-Fi is here.

Wireless communication with visible light is, in fact, not a new idea. Everyone knows about using smoke signals on a desert island to try to capture attention. Perhaps less well known is that in the time of Napoleon much of Europe was covered with optical telegraphs, otherwise known as the semaphore. Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, actually regarded the photophone as his most important invention, a device that used a mirror to relay the vibrations caused by speech over a beam of light. Continue reading

Nobel Prize awarded for pioneering discoveries in parasite-fighting drugs

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The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded on Monday to three scientists who discovered treatments for three of the most devastating parasite-borne diseases. Irish-born scientist William C. Campbell and Japanese scientist Satoshi Ōmura were jointly awarded half the prize for their discovery of a therapy to treat infections caused by roundworm parasites. Chinese scientist Youyou Tu received the other half for her discovery of a new therapy for Malaria.

Campbell and Ōmura discovered the drug Avermectin, a modified form of which has dramatically reduced cases of river blindness and lymphatic filariasis/elephantiasis. It has also been effective against a growing number of other parasitic diseases. Both are caused by parasitic worms, which afflict an estimated third of the world’s population and are most prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Central and South America. Continue reading

Here’s how to make perfect diamonds in the microwave

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Right now, odds are that one in every four diamonds on sale around the world is ablood diamond – mined in a war zone and sold to finance armed conflict and civil war. And for those wanting to steer clear of such a commodity, it’s becoming nearly impossible to figure out the difference between a clean and a dirty diamond.

Which is why the market for lab-made diamonds is slowly but surely growing, offering a cheaper, more environmentally friendly, and ethically sound option that looks just as pretty as its natural counterpart. "To a modern young consumer, if they get a diamond from above the ground or in the ground, do they really care?" Chaim Even-Zohar from Tacy, an Israel-based diamond consulting firm, points out toBloomberg Businessweek. Continue reading

9 Sure Ways to Protect Your Eyes during Computer Use

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Most jobs nowadays including mine involves some degree of computer usage, meaning almost everyone will be spending time in front of a computer. Unfortunately, this can result in eye strain or injury. In order to avoid this, you’ll have to properly protect your eyes both in front of and away from the computer.

  1. Sit far enough away from the screen. This is usually considered at least an arm’s length away from the screen. To make sure your computer is positioned right, try the high-five test: if you can’t properly high-five your computer screen with a full arm extension, you’re sitting too close. Continue reading

They Call It The APPLE RING!

What comes next after the luxurious Apple 🍎 watch? One would think that the trend of technological wearable’s would be over as soon as the Apple Watch hits the stores. But it seems like that isn’t true because we are here hearing of rumours that the next big thing is the Apple Ring!! Continue reading

IPhone Users who Can’t Data Should Turn Off This New iOS 9 Feature | Lol Can’t Afford Data

Open the Settings app on your iPhone.

This post is for all those people who frustrated themselves just to afford an Iphone but can’t afford the data plan (cough’s, you’re still poor) lol.   Its just so sad when you want to talk to your friend that has an Iphone and their like I don’t got data, WTF!

Apple has released its new mobile operating system, iOS 9 and there is this new feature that data diprived iphone people need to know about and turn off.

The feature is called “Wi-Fi Assist.” It will automatically switch to the cell network for data if it detects an inconsistent WiFi signal.
It’s a cool way to ensure you stay connected as you use your phone. But it can also eat up more data.
So if you are one of the many people with an iPhone and a crappy data plan, you should turn it off. Here’s how, in four easy steps.
(Remember, this is just for people who have upgraded to iOS 9.) Continue reading

A 16! year-old Girl!! has devised a faster and cheaper way to detect Ebola…Wow!

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Whoo! This just a whole meaning to the shame! Now all those Nigerian students in the sciences especially those Ogas (bosses)/wanna’s be medicine students that keep on feeling themselves…I leave you to your God.

Oliva Hallisey, a 16-year-old from the US, won the 2015 Google Science Fair with her project to develop a fast, cheap, and stable test for the Ebola virus, which she says gives easy-to-read results in less than 30 minutes – potentially before someone is even showing symptoms. Continue reading

Microsoft Sends Ahmed Mohammed Some Cool, Very Cool Toys!

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A BLOODY #3DPRINTER
Earlier this week, Ahmed Mohamed, a 14-year-old, was arrested for allegedly bringing a bomb to school. After the humiliating arrest and investigation, it was found that Ahmed was simply trying to display his creativity by showing his teacher a homemade digital clock. Unfortunately for him, his teacher felt threatened and decided to make a judgment call. But, in light of the situation, there has been a tremendous outpour of support from social media and important figures like the US President, Mark Zuckerberg, Hillary Clinton etc.. Continue reading

Watch: Is masturbation good for you?

Despite rumours that masturbation can lead to infertility and even blindness, research has shown that it’s actually got a whole lot going for it. First up, let’s just be honest – 95 percent of men and 72 percent of women reading this are just here to feel good about what you’re already doing behind closed doors (hopefully). But if the rest of you have been holding out your entire lives, just waiting for science to give you a reason to enjoy your alone time a little too much, it’s time to cancel your plans and get down to it, because according to the latest episode of AsapSCIENCE, you’re doing yourself no favours by… doing yourself no favours.  And if you don’t “mix up your techniques”, you could actually render yourself unresponsive to other types of sexual stimulation when you’re not alone.  So listen As the boys from AsapSCIENCE explain,

world’s first head transplant patient books procedure for 2017

A man set to become the world’s first head transplant patient has scheduled the procedure for December 2017. 30 year old Valery Spiridonov was diagnosed with a genetic muscle-wasting condition called Werdnig-Hoffmann disease, and volunteered for the procedure despite the risks involved, Central European News (CEN) reported. Continue reading

The sleeping habits of the rich, the powerful, and the genius

The sleeping habits of the rich, the powerful, and the genius kind of means less sleep…

Despite what science says about how crucial a good night’s sleep is to your health and longevity, one thing’s clear from the infographic below – some of history’s most powerful and intelligent people had very little time for it.

Serbian-American inventor, engineer, and fan-favourite, Nikola Tesla, is said to have adopted what’s probably the most ill-advised sleeping habit of them all – devoting just five hours a day to rest, only two of which were dedicated to actual sleep. And this wasn’t something he implemented when he realised he had too many inventions and too little time. In his book, Prodigal Genius: The Life of Nikola Teslaauthor John J. O’Neil says Tesla was terrible at sleeping, even when he was just a boy: Continue reading